What is Money?

This volume provocatively rethinks the economics, politics and sociology of money and examines the classic question of what is money. Starting from the two dominant views of money, as neutral instrument and as social relation, What is Money? presents a thematic, interdisciplinary approach which points to a definitive statement on money. Bringing together a variety of neclassical and heterodox perspectives, this work collects the latest thinking of some of the best-known economics scholars on the question of money. The contributors are Victoria Chick, Kevin Dowd, Gilles Dostaler, Steve Fleetwood, Gunnar Heinsohn, Geoff Ingham, Peter Kennedy, Peter G. Klein, Bernard Maris, Scott Meikle, Alain Parguez, Colin Rodgers, T.K.Rymes, Mario Seccarreccia, George Selgin, Otto Steiger, John Smithin and L. Randall Wray.

Quick Sketching with Ron Husband

Quick sketching is the best technique you can use to stay finely tuned and to keep those creative juices flowing. To keep your sense of observation heightened, and to sharpen your hand-eye coordination, an animator needs to constantly draw and sketch. Quick Sketching with Ron Husband offers instruction to quick sketching and all its techniques. From observing positive and negative space and learning to recognize simple shapes in complex forms to action analysis and using line of action, this Disney legend teaches you how to sketch using all these components, and how to do it in a matter of seconds. On top of instruction and advice, you’ll also see Ron’s portfolio of select art representing his growth as an artist throughout the years. Watch his drawings as he grows from a young, talented artist, to a true Disney animator. Follow him as he goes around the world and sketches flamenco dancers, football players, bakers, joggers, lions, tigers, anyone, and anything. As if instruction and inspiration in one place weren’t enough, you’ll find a sketchbook included, so you can flip from Ron’s techniques and work on perfecting basic shapes. Or take your book on the road, read Ron’s advice, sketch away, capture the world around you.

Quantum Theory and the Flight from Realism: Philosophical Responses to Quantum Mechanics

This book is a critical introduction to the long-standing debate concerning the conceptual foundations of quantum mechanics and the problems it has posed for physicists and philosophers from Einstein to the present. Quantum theory has been a major infulence on postmodernism, and presents significant problems for realists. Keeping his own realist position in check, Christopher Norris subjects a wide range of key opponents and supporters of realism to a high and equal level of scrutiny. With a characteristic combination of rigour and intellectual generosity, he draws out the merits and weaknesses from opposing arguments. In a sequence of closely argued chapters, Norris examines the premises of orthodox quantum theory, as developed most influentially by Bohr and Heisenberg, and its impact on varous philosophical developments. These include the ideas developed by W.V Quine, Thomas Kuhn, Michael Dummett, Bas van Fraassen, and Hilary Puttnam. In each case, Norris argues, these thinkers have been influenced by the orthodox construal of quantum mechanics as requiring drastic revision of principles which had hitherto defined the very nature of scientific method, causal explanati and rational enquiry. Putting the case for a realist approach which adheres to well-tried scientific principles of causal reasoning and inference to the best explanation, Christopher Norris clarifies these debates to a non-specialist readership and scholars of philosophy, science studies and the philosophy of science alike. Quantum Theory and the Flight From Realism suggests that philosophical reflection can contribute to a better understanding of these crucial, current issues.

Cooking and Coping Among the Cacti: Diet, Nutrition and Available Income in Northwestern Mexico

Using data collected from 105 households in Sonora, Mexico, the author combines detailed ethnographic research with quantitative analyses of income, diet, and nutritional status to examine the dietary patterns of residents who “cook and cope among the cacti.” Employing a new analytical concept of “available income” – which can differ greatly from total income and provide valuable insight into why people eat what they do – the work explores a variety of social and cultural factors that affect food expenditure and consumption. Home production of food and the extent to which women are employed outside of the home are just two of the many variables discussed that influence available income and how it is used. But even among groups with similar available incomes, variables of ethnicity, prestige, nutritional knowledge, and the desire for consumer goods come into play.