Wireless Network Deployments

An important aspect of wireless networks is the deployment of their infrastructure. In this book, the Editors have invited a number of experts from industry to write on a variety of topics associated with deployment of digital wireless networks. The first part of the book consists of an overview of systems design and engineering integration, comparison of polarization and space diversity antenna systems, and the performance of deploying smart antenna architectures in cellular and PCS networks. The second part addresses deployment of CDMA networks, based on IS-95 standards. Here the authors discuss issues related to optimization of overlaid dual model CDMA networks, embedding microcells to improve hot-spot capacity, and mitigation of intermodulation distortion in handsets. Part III deals with deployment of TDMA- based networks. The issues presented include developing hierarchical systems, reconfigurable transceivers, and deploying the GSM frequency hopping feature for enhancing existing traffic capacity. The last part, on Wireless Data Networks, is comprised of issues related to the performance of GPRS systems deployed as an upgrade on current networks and deployment of wireless LANs. Critical issues for deploying an IEEE 802.11-based WLAN are examined. Wireless Network Deployments provides practical engineering guidance for wireless and cellular engineers, researchers, technicians, and managers working in second and third generation digital wireless networks.

Wireless Multimedia Network Technologies

This book is a collection of invited papers that were presented at the Ninth IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, September 5-8, 1998, Boston, MA. These papers are meant to provide a global view of the emerging third-generation wireless networks in the wake of the third millennium. Following the tradition of the PIMRC conferences, the papers are selected to strike a balance between the diverse interests of academia and industry by addressing issues of interest to the designers, manufacturers, and service providers involved in the wireless networking industry. The tradition of publishing a collection of the invited papers presented at the PIMRC started in PIMRC’97, Helsinki, Finland. There are two benefits to this tradition (1) it provides a shorter version of the proceedings of the conference that is more focused on a specific theme (2) the papers are comprehensive and are subject of a more careful review process to improve the contents as well as the presentation of the material, making it more appealing for archival as a reference book. The production costs of the book is subsidized by the conference and the editors have donated the royalty income of the book to the conference.

Wireless Location in CDMA Cellular Radio Systems

With the increasing market penetration of cellular telephones, the number of E-911 calls placed by cellular telephones has grown cons- erably. This growth in E-911 calls led to a 1996 FCC ruling requiring that all cellular, PCS, and SMR licensees provide location information for the support of E-911 safety services. The provision of such location information is to be implemented in two phases. Phase I, whose deadline has already been passed, requires that wireless carriers relay the caller’s telephone number along with location of the cell site and/or sector se- ing the call, to a designated Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP). This information allows the PSAP to return the call if disconnected. Phase II, to be completed by October 1, 2001, is much more stringent and requires that the location of an E-911 caller be determined and reported with an rms location accuracy of 125 m in 67% of the cases. The applications of wireless location technology extend well beyond E-911 services. Location information can be used by cellular telephone operators themselves for more effective management of their radio – sources, so as to achieve greater spectral efficiencies. Resource m- agement algorithms such as hand-offs between cell sites, channel assi- ments, and others can all benefit from subscriber location information. Location information obtained from vehicular based cellular telephones can be used as an input to Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), and in particular traffic management and traveler information systems.

Wireless Communication Using Dual Antenna Arrays

At present, the expansion of tetherless communications is a technological trend surpassed perhaps only by the explosive growth of the Internet. Wireless systems are being deployed today mainly for telephony, satisfying the ind- trialized nations’ appetite for talk-on-the-go, and providing much-needed communications infrastructure in developing countries. The desire for wi- less access to the Internet is starting to add fuel to the growth of tetherless communications. Indeed, the synergy of wireless and Internet technologies will lead to a host of exciting new applications, some of which are not yet envisioned. Future-generation wireless systems will achieve capacities much higher than the systems of today by incorporating myriad improvements. These in- vations include transmission in higher-frequency bands, “smart antennas”, multi-user detection, new forward error-correction techniques, and advanced network resource-allocation techniques. The term “smart antenna” usually refers to the deployment of multiple antennas at the base-station site, coupled with special processing of the m- tiple received signals. Smart antennas can adaptively reject co-channel int- ference and mitigate multipath fading, and have been identified by many as a promising means to extend base-station coverage, increase system capacity and enhance quality of service.

Wireless Communication Technologies: New MultiMedia Systems

During 12-15 of September 1999, 10th International Symposium on P- sonal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC’99) was held in Osaka Japan, and it was really a successful symposium that accommodated more than 600 participants from more than 30 countries and regions. PIMRC is really well organized annual symposium for wireless multimedia commu- cation systems, in which, various up-to-date topics are discussed in the invited talk, panel discussions and tutorial sessions. One of the unique features of the PIMRC is that PIMRC is continuing to publish, from Kluwer Academic Publishers since 1997, a book that collects the hottest topics discussed in PIMRC. In PIMRC’97, Invited talks were sum- rized in “Wireless Communications –TDMA versus CDMA – (ISBN 0-7923- 8005-3),” and it was published just beforePIMRC’97. This book was also distributed to all the PIMRC’97 participants as a part of proceedings for the conference. In PIMRC’98, extendedversion of the invited papers were s- marized in Wireless Multimedia Network Technologies (ISBN 0-7923-8633- 7) and published in September 1999, which is almost the same timing for the PIMRC’99. In the case of PIMRC’99, to produce more informative book, we have – lected topics that attracted many PIMRC’99 participants during the conf- ence, and invited prospective authors not only from the invited speakers but also from tutorial speakers, panel organizers, panelists, and some other exc- lent PIMRC’99 participants.

Space-Time Processing for CDMA Mobile Communications

Space-Time Processing for CDMA Mobile Communications is one of the first books to: bring together spatial/temporal channel models and analytic performance evaluation techniques; establish a link between smart antenna systems and advanced receiver design techniques; treat smart antennas specifically for UMTS-like communication systems, with applicable simulations and calculations; supply code with Matlab® GUI so readers can run or modify existing simulations or create new ones. The field of smart antenna technology or, more generally, space-time processing is rapidly becoming one of the most promising areas of mobile communications, especially regarding the development of the first practical third-generation mobile communication systems. The authors have addressed many of the most basic questions relating to the use of space-time processing in CDMA-based third-generation systems and have presented models for the integration of space-time processing, error correction coding, and multi-user detection techniques. Included is extensive background information on cellular systems, antenna array theory, smart antenna techniques, performance of basic space-time processors and advanced space-time processors. The book also includes an extensive simulation program written in Matlab®. The simulation code implements both the uplink and the downlink of a UMTS-like communication system. This provides multiple options for simulating system performance using a variety of channel models as well as receiver structures. Space-Time Processing for CDMA Mobile Communications will be an invaluable reference work for engineers and researchers, and a useful source for design engineers enabling them to understand the implications of adding space-time processing systems to CDMA-based communication systems.

Space Division Multiple Access for Wireless Local Area Networks

Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) are experiencing a growing importance recently. Whereas WLANs were primarily used for niche applications in the past, they are now deployed as wireless extensions to computer networks. The increase of the datarates from 2 Mbps up to 11 Mbps for roughly a constant price has played a major role in this breakthrough. As a consequence, an even greater success can be envisioned for the more recent OFDM-based WLAN standards in the 5 GHz band that offer up to 54 Mbps. At IMEC we have realized this potential already several years ago and have established a successful research program on OFDM-based WLAN. The program resulted in an operational prototype of a 5 GHz OFDM system. The longer term goals of this program are to extend the indoor range of the WLAN systems up to 100 m and to increase the capacity above 100 Mbps. Driven by these goals, Patrick embarked on the usage of multiple antenna techniques and, more in particular, Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA) for WLAN as the topic for his doctoral research. During this research, key contributions were made towards making SDMA for WLAN a reality. To name a few: A basic scheme for combining OFDM and SDMA was proposed. Also realistic non-linear detection methods were developed. These me- ods achieve a high implementation efficiency, by exploiting the p- allelism of the data model and the frequency-selectivity of the pr- agation channel.

Smart Antenna Systems and Wireless LANs

This book concerns two major topics, smart antenna systems and wireless local-area-networks (LANs). For smart antenna systems, it d- cusses the mechanics behind a smart antenna system, the setup of a smart antenna experimental testbed, and experimental and computer simulation results of various issues relating to smart antenna systems. For wireless LAN systems, it discusses the IEEE 802.11 worldwide wi- less LAN standard, the operation of a wireless LAN system, and some of the technical considerations that must be overcome by a wireless LAN system designer. These two topics are combined in the discussion of the Smart Wireless LAN (SWL) system, which was designed to achieve the benefits which smart antenna systems can provide for wireless LAN systems while still remaining compatible with the 802.11 wireless LAN standard. The design of SWL calls for the replacement of the conv- tional wireless LAN base station (which are called access points in the 802.11 documentation) with an SWL base station, while leaving the – dividual terminal operation as unchanged as possible.

Signal Processing for Wireless Communication Systems

Signal Processing for Wireless Communication Systems brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this fast moving area. The Contributors to this work were selected from leading researchers and practitioners in this field. The book’s 18 chapters are divided into three areas: systems, Networks, and Implementation Issues; Channel Estimation and Equalization; and Multiuser Detection. The Work, originally published as Volume 30, Numbers 1-3 of the Journal of VLSI Signal Processing Systems for Signal, Image, and Video Technology, will be valuable to anyone working or researching in the field of wireless communication systems. It serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most challenging issues being examined today.

Scrambling Techniques for CDMA Communications

This invaluable text addresses spreading, scrambling and synchronization techniques for use in inter-cell synchronous and asynchronous CDMA systems, including the IMT-2000. It provides fundamental background material and introduces novel acquisition techniques that enable rapid and robust acquisition of inter-cell synchronous and asynchronous IMT-2000 CDMA systems.