Human and Minority Rights Protection by Multiple Diversity Governance

Human and Minority Rights Protection by Multiple Diversity Governance provides a comprehensive overview and critical analysis of minority protection through national constitutional law and international law in Europe. Using a critical theoretical and methodological approach, this textbook: provides a historical analysis of state formation and nation building in Europe with context of religious wars and political revolutions, including the (re-)conceptualisation of basic concepts and terms such as territoriality, sovereignty, state, nation and citizenship; deconstructs all primordial theories of ethnicity and provides a sociologically informed political theory for how to reconcile the functional prerequisites for political unity, legal equality and social cohesion with the preservation of cultural diversity; examines the liberal and nationalist ideological framing of minority protection in liberal-democratic regimes, including the case law of the European Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Justice; analyses the ongoing trend of re-nationalisation in all parts of Europe and the number of legal instruments and mechanisms from voting rights to proportional representation in state bodies, forms of cultural and territorial autonomy and federalism. This textbook will be essential reading for students, scholars and practitioners interested in European politics, human and minority rights, constitutional and international law, governance and nationalism.

Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Japan

The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Japan presents a synthesized, interdisciplinary study of contemporary Japan based on up-to-date theoretical models designed to provide readers with a comprehensive and full understanding of the dynamics of contemporary Japan. In order to achieve this, the Handbook is organized into two parts. Part I, ‘Foundations’, clarifies the state of contemporary Japan topic by topic by referring to the latest theoretical developments in the relevant disciplinary fields of politics, international relations, economy, society, culture and the personal. Part II, ‘Issues’, then offers a series of concrete analyses building upon the theoretical discussions introduced in Part I to help undergraduate and postgraduate students learn how to conduct independent analysis. Locating Japan in a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective, this Handbook is an essential resource for students and scholars interested in Japanese studies, Asian studies and global studies.

British Government: A Reader in Policy Making

This reader presents over seventy case studies of policy making in Whitehall and Westminster, combining newspaper coverage, official documents, academic analysis and the recollections of participants. Simon James demonstrates the various ways in which policy originates, the way it is shaped within Whitehall, the different modes of parliamentary control, and the problems of implementation and policy review. He illustrates civil servants’ part in developing policy, ministers’ relations with their departments and their colleagues, and the role of the prime minister and cabinet. Case studies help to examine cabinet committees, the influence of pressure groups and select committees as well as the consequences of independent inquiries, the impact of the European Community and the restraining power of parliament and the courts. The case studies range from national controversies such as the pits closure crisis and the “Satanic Verses” affair, through to the hidden side of policy making including deals struck with pressure groups in Whitehall conference and wrangling in Brussels over the tax on whisky. Designed as a textbook for A-level students and undergraduates, “Policy Making in the British Government” provides a broad range of source material and analysis that will be of value to students of British politics, policy making and political institutions.

Consuming Places

John Urry has been discussing and writing on these and similar questions for the past fifteen years. In Consuming Places, he gathers together his most significant contributions. Urry begins with an extensive review of the connections between society, time and space. The concept of ‘society’, the nature of ‘locality’, the significance of ‘economic restructuring’, and the concept of the ‘rural’, are examined in relationship to place. The book then considers how places have been transformed by the development of service occupations and industries. Concepts of the service class and post-industrialism are theoretically and empirically discussed. Attention is then devoted to the ways in which places are consumed. Particular attention is devoted to the visual character of such consumption and its implications for place and people. The implications for nature and the environment are also explored in depth. The changing nature of consumption, and the tensions between commodification and collective enthusiasms, are explored in the context of the changing ways in which the countryside is consumed.

Anna Komnene and Her Times

This significant critical anthology explores the life of Anna Komnene, the Byzantine context in which she wrote, and the impact of the Alexiad on her times and on subsequent historical works of literature.

Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus: Introduction to Schizoanalysis

Eugene W. Holland provides an excellent introduction to Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus which is widely recognized as one of the most influential texts in philosophy to have appeared in the last thirty years.


He lucidly presents the theoretical concerns behind Anti-Oedipus and explores with clarity the diverse influences of Marx, Freud, Nietzsche and Kant on the development of Deleuze & Guattari’s thinking. He also examines the wider implications of their work in revitalizing Marxism, environmentalism, feminism and cultural studies.

Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus

Eugene W. Holland provides an excellent introduction to Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus which is widely recognized as one of the most influential texts in philosophy to have appeared in the last thirty years. He lucidly presents the theoretical concerns behind Anti-Oedipus and explores with clarity the diverse influences of Marx, Freud, Nietzsche and Kant on the development of Deleuze & Guattari’s thinking. He also examines the wider implications of their work in revitalizing Marxism, environmentalism, feminism and cultural studies.

Mark’s Gospel

Mark’s ‘biography’ of Jesus is the earliest of the four gospels, and influenced them all. The distinctive feature of this biography is the quality of ‘good news’, which presupposes a world dominated by the forces of evil.
John Painter shows how the rhetorical and dramatic shaping of the book emphasises the conflict of good and evil at many levels – between Jesus and the Jewish authorities, Jesus and the Roman authorities, and the conflict of values within the disciples themselves. These matters of content are integral to this original approach to Mark’s theodicy, while the stylistic issue raises the question of Mark’s intended readership.
John Painter’s succinct yet thorough treatment of Mark’s gospel opens up not only these rhetorical issues, but the social context of the gospel, which Painter argues to be that of the Pauline mission to the nations.

Mark’s Gospel

Mark’s ‘biography’ of Jesus is the earliest of the four gospels, and influenced them all. The distinctive feature of this biography is the quality of ‘good news’, which presupposes a world dominated by the forces of evil. John Painter shows how the rhetorical and dramatic shaping of the book emphasises the conflict of good and evil at many levels – between Jesus and the Jewish authorities, Jesus and the Roman authorities, and the conflict of values within the disciples themselves. These matters of content are integral to this original approach to Mark’s theodicy, while the stylistic issue raises the question of Mark’s intended readership. John Painter’s succinct yet thorough treatment of Mark’s gospel opens up not only these rhetorical issues, but the social context of the gospel, which Painter argues to be that of the Pauline mission to the nations.