Heart of Development, V. 2: Adolescence

In these groundbreaking new collections, the reader will find an exciting, boad-ranging selection of work showing an array of applications of the Gestalt model to working with children, adolescents, and their families and worlds. From the theoretical to the hands-on, and from the clinical office or playroom to family settings, schools, institutions, and the community, these chapters take us on a rewarding tour of the vibrant, productive range of Gestalt work today, always focusing on the first two decades of life. With each new topic and setting, fresh and creative ideas and interventions are offered and described, for use by practitioners of every school and method.

Infecting the Treatment: Being an HIV-Positive Analyst

The revelation of being HIV positive continues to be a discourse fraught with meaning.  In Infecting the Treatment: Being an HIV-Positive Analyst, Gilbert Cole offers an intimate and deeply insightful examination of disclosure of his HIV seropositivity on his analytic sense of self and on his clinical work with patients.
 
Cole begins his journey of discovery by meditating on the meanings that being HIV positive have had for him, and by situating these personal meanings within the multiple meanings of HIV seropositivity generated by our culture, leading to a clinical discussion of the pros and cons of disclosure to one’s patients.  What begins as a consideration of disclosure of an ostensibly medical fact, opens to an exploration of the broader problematic of disclosure in the context of questions of sameness and difference, of dependence and autonomy, and of the ethical ground of psychoanalytic practice.  He illuminates these issues by circling back to his own predicament, which took the form of an apparent conflict between his self-image as a psychoanalytic therapist committed to a psychoanalytic treatment approach and aspects of his self-experience that seemed uncomfortably dissonant with this identity and this commitment.  He approached resolution of this conflict when he became able to use his HIV seropositivity as a metaphor for aspects of the treatment process.  


Comprising Cole’s personal engagement of the issues inherent in being an HIV-positive analyst, his report of clinical work attendant to disclosure of his condition, and a research project compiling the experiences of other HIV-positive analysts, Infecting the Treatment is an intimate and deeply insightful examination of the impact of one analyst’s disclosure of HIV seropositivity on his analytic sense of self.  With admirable candor and uncommon thoughtfulness, Cole shows how the analyst’s disclosure of information of the most meaningful sort may deepen and even transform the therapeutic dialogue. 

Metamorphosis: On the Conflict of Human Development and the Development of Creativity

First published in 1959, Metamorphosis remains one of the great works of developmental psychology of the past century. From his thoughtful meditation on the assumptions of classical Freudian psychoanalysis, among them the pleasure and reality principles, the relations of drive and affect, and the nature and causes of infantile amnesia, Schachtel moves on to profound reflections on the senses considered both in terms of their evolving relation to one another during maturation and as variable ingredients in the perception and cognition of the adult.

Experiential Foundations of Rorschach’s Test

Schachtel shared with his great contemporary David Rapaport the goal of scientifically reframing the psychoanalytic understanding of personality. Experiential Foundations of Rorschach’s Test, first published in 1966, is in one sense Schachtel’s extended dialogue with Rapaport (in the guise of Schachtel’s interlocutor) about this ambitious task. In the course of his brilliant and lucid meditation on this topic, Schachtel attempted far more than the simple explication of particular test responses. His book contains, and should be read as, an entire theory of personality considered in terms of the ways in which one person may meaningfully and detectably differ from another.

Experiential Foundations of Rorschach’s Test

Schachtel shared with his great contemporary David Rapaport the goal of scientifically reframing the psychoanalytic understanding of personality. Experiential Foundations of Rorschach’s Test, first published in 1966, is in one sense Schachtel’s extended dialogue with Rapaport (in the guise of Schachtel’s interlocutor) about this ambitious task. In the course of his brilliant and lucid meditation on this topic, Schachtel attempted far more than the simple explication of particular test responses. His book contains, and should be read as, an entire theory of personality considered in terms of the ways in which one person may meaningfully and detectably differ from another.

The Therapist as a Person: Life Crises, Life Choices, Life Experiences, and Their Effects on Treatment

In this collection of powerfully illuminating and often poignant essays, contributors candidly discuss the impact of central life crises and identity concerns on their work as therapists. With chapters focusing on identity concerns associated with the body-self (body size, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and age), urgent life crises, and defining life circumstances, The Therapist as a Person exemplifies the myriad ways in which the therapist’s subjectivity shapes his or her interaction with patients. Included in the collection are life events rarely if ever dealt with in the literature: the death of family members, late pregnancy loss, divorce, the failure of the therapist’s own therapy, infertility and childlessness, the decision to adopt a child, and the parenting of a profoundly deaf child.

Psychoanalysis and Motivation

Carrying forward his inquiry into the nature and conditions of normal and abnormal development, Lichtenberg focuses on motivation. His goal is to offer an alternative to psychoanalytic drive theory that accommodates the developmental insights of infancy research while accounting for the entire range of phenomena addressed by the theory of instinctual drives. To this end, he propounds a comprehensive theory of the self, which then gains expression in five discrete yet interactive motivational systems.

The Clinical Exchange: Techniques Derived from Self and Motivational Systems

In this practical sequel to the same authors’ Self and Motivational Systems (TAP, 1992), Lichtenberg, Lachmann, and Fosshage offer ten principles of technique to guide the clinical exchange. These principles, which pertain equally to exploratory psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, integrate the findings of self psychology with recent developmental research that has refined our understanding of the self as a center of experience and motivation. The ten principles of technique not only provide a valuable framework for attending to a wide range of motivations, but lead to basic revisions in the theory and technical management of affects, transference, and dreams.

A Meeting of Minds: Mutuality in Psychoanalysis

In this richly nuanced assessment of the various dimensions of mutuality in psychoanalysis, Aron shows that the relational approach to psychoanalysis is a powerful guide to issues of technique and therapeutic strategy. From his reappraisal of the concepts of interaction and enactment, to his examination of the issue of analyst self-disclosure, to his concluding remarks on the relational import of the analyst’s ethics and values, Aron squarely accepts the clinical responsibilities attendant to a postmodern critique of psychoanalytic foundations.

Clinical Values: Emotions That Guide Psychoanalytic Treatment

In this refreshingly honest and open book, Sandra Buechler looks at therapeutic process issues from the standpoint of the human qualities and human resourcefulness that the therapist brings to each clinical encounter.  Her concern is with the clinical values that shape the psychoanalytically oriented treatment experience.  How, she asks, can one person evoke a range of values–curiosity, hope, kindness, courage, sense of purpose, emotional balance, the ability to bear loss, and integrity–in another person and thereby promote psychological change?  For Buechler, these core values, and the emotions that infuse them, are at the heart of the clinical process. They permeate the texture and tone, and shape the content of what therapists say. They provide the framework for formulating and working toward treatment goals and keep the therapist emotionally alive in the face of the often draining vicissitudes of the treatment process.


Clinical Values:  Emotions That Guide Psychoanalytic Treatment is addressed to therapists young and old.  By focusing successively on different emotion-laden values, Buechler shows how one value or another can center the therapist within the session. Taken together, these values function as a clinical compass that provides the therapist with a sense of direction and militates against the all too frequent sense of “flying by the seat of one’s pants.”  Buechler makes clear that the values that guide treatment derive from the full range of the clinician’s human experiences, and she is candid in relating the personal experiences–from inside and outside the consulting room–that inform her own matrix of clinical values and her own clinical approach.  A compelling record of one gifted therapist’s pathway to clinical maturity, Clinical Values has a more general import:  It exemplifies the variegated ways in which productive clinical work of any type ultimately revolves around the therapist’s ability to make the most of being “all too human.”